Title A randomized controlled trial of contingency management for smoking abstinence versus contingency management for shaping cessation: One-year outcome
Authors Secades-Villa R., LÓPEZ NUÑEZ, CARLA, Weidberg S., González-Roz A., Alonso-Pérez F., LÓPEZ NUÑEZ, CARLA
External publication No
Means Exp. Clin. Psychopharmacol.
Scope Article
Nature Científica
JCR Quartile 2
SJR Quartile 1
JCR Impact 2.21700
Area International
Web https://www.scopus.com/inward/record.uri?eid=2-s2.0-85062937912&doi=10.1037%2fpha0000269&partnerID=40&md5=24f3528940642a59d551a98e042daddb
Publication date 01/01/2019
ISI 000500013400006
Scopus Id 2-s2.0-85062937912
DOI 10.1037/pha0000269
Abstract This study analyzed whether a contingency management (CM) for shaping cessation period implemented prior to an abstinence-only period (CMS) improves outcomes relative to CM that reinforces only a fixed abstinence criteria (CMA) among treatment-seeking patients in a community setting. A total of 110 patients were randomly assigned to 1 of 2 treatment conditions: CMA (N = 55) or CMS (N = 55). All participants received cognitive-behavioral treatment (CBT) implemented in 6 group-based sessions. CMA participants earned voucher-based incentives contingent on providing biochemical evidence of smoking abstinence. CMS reinforced closer approximations to smoking abstinence. At posttreatment, patients assigned to the CMA group achieved the same rates of smoking abstinence (point-prevalence) as those in the CMS group (94.5%; p > .05). At the 6-month follow-up, 43.6% of the patients who received CMA maintained smoking abstinence in comparison to 32.7% in the CMS group (p > .05). At the 12-month follow-up, 40% of the participants assigned to the CMA group were abstinent, in comparison to 29.1% who received CMS (p > .05). There were no statistically significant differences in continuous smoking abstinence between the treatment conditions in any of the follow-ups (p > .05). These results offer a novel contribution by suggesting that CM was associated with enduring effects up to 12 months after the end of treatment and that CM for shaping cessation period implemented prior to an abstinence-only period (CMS) improves outcomes relative to CM that reinforces only a fixed abstinence criteria (CMA) among treatment-seeking patients in a community setting. © 2019 American Psychological Association.
Keywords adult; article; cognitive behavioral therapy; controlled study; female; follow up; human; major clinical study; male; prevalence; randomized controlled trial; smoking cessation; PsycINFO
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