Title The Effect of Prescription Drugs and Alcohol Consumption on Intimate Partner Violence Victim Blaming
Authors SAEZ DÍAZ, GEMMA, Ruiz, Manuel J., Delclos-Lopez, Gabriel, Exposito, Francisca, FERNÁNDEZ ARTAMENDI, SERGIO, FERNÁNDEZ ARTAMENDI, SERGIO, SAEZ DÍAZ, GEMMA
External publication No
Means Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health
Scope Article
Nature Científica
JCR Quartile 1
SJR Quartile 2
Area International
Publication date 01/07/2020
ISI 000550328300001
DOI 10.3390/ijerph17134747
Abstract Intimate Partner Violence (IPV) is a public health problem with harsh consequences for women's well-being. Social attitudes towards victims of IPV have a big impact on the perpetuation of this phenomenon. Moreover, specific problems such as the abuse of alcohol and drugs by IPV victims could have an effect on blame attributions towards them. The aim of this study was to evaluate whether the external perception (Study 1) and self-perception (Study 2) of blame were influenced by the victims' use and abuse of alcohol or by the victims' use of psychotropic prescription drugs. Results of the first study (N = 136 participants) showed a significantly higher blame attribution towards female victims with alcohol abuse compared to those without it. No significant differences were found on blame attributed to those with psychotropic prescription drugs abuse and the control group. Results of the second study (N = 195 female victims of interpersonal violence) showed that alcohol consumption is associated with higher self-blame and self-blame cognitions among IPV victims. However, results did not show significant differences on self-blame associated to the victims' use of psychotropic prescription drugs. Our findings indicate that alcohol consumption, but not prescription drugs use, plays a relevant role in the attribution of blame by general population and self-blame by victims of IPV.
Keywords alcohol; attitudes; intimate partner violence; prescription-drug; victim blaming
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