Título Are All Code-Switches Processed Alike? Examining Semantic v. Language Unexpectancy
Autores Valdés Kroff J.R., ROMÁN FERNÁNDEZ, PATRICIA ELENA, Dussias P.E., ROMÁN FERNÁNDEZ, PATRICIA ELENA
Publicación externa No
Medio Front. Psychol.
Alcance Article
Naturaleza Científica
Cuartil JCR 2
Cuartil SJR 1
Ámbito Internacional
Web https://www.scopus.com/inward/record.uri?eid=2-s2.0-85091100700&doi=10.3389%2ffpsyg.2020.02138&partnerID=40&md5=3d3c60a0637b3556d997002d130aa491
Fecha de publicacion 01/01/2020
ISI 000572503000001
Scopus Id 2-s2.0-85091100700
DOI 10.3389/fpsyg.2020.02138
Abstract Prior studies using the event-related potential (ERP) technique show that integrating sentential code-switches during online processing leads to a broadly distributed late positivity component (LPC), while processing semantically unexpected continuations instead leads to the emergence of an N400 effect. While the N400 is generally assumed to index lexico-semantic processing, the LPC has two different interpretations. One account suggests that it reflects the processing of an improbable or unexpected event, while an alternative account proposes sentence-level reanalysis. To investigate the relative costs of semantic to language-based unexpectancies (i.e., code-switches), the current study tests 24 Spanish-English bilinguals in an ERP reading study. Semantically constrained Spanish frames either varied in their semantic expectancy (high vs. low expectancy) and/or their language continuation (same-language vs. code-switch) while participants’ electrophysiological responses were recorded. The Spanish-to-English switch direction provides a more naturalistic test for integration costs to code-switching as it better approximates the code-switching practices of the target population. Analyses across three time windows show a main effect for semantic expectancy in the N400 time window and a main effect for code-switching in the LPC time window. Additional analyses based on the self-reported code-switching experience of the participants suggest an early positivity linked to less experience with code-switching. The results highlight that not all code-switches lead to similar integration costs and that prior experience with code-switching is an important additional factor that modulates online processing. © Copyright © 2020 Valdés Kroff, Román and Dussias.
Palabras clave bilingual (Spanish/English); code-switching; event-related potentials; late positive complex; N400; semantic processing
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